Słówka pochodzenia hiszpańskiego w angielskim


hiszpańskie słówka w języku angielskim

  • alligator = el lagarto = “the lizard”
  • amigo = from Spanish and/or Portuguese amigo, "friend"; from Latin amicus meaning "friend," derived from amare (to love).
  • armada = armada = “armed” fleet of ships
  • armadillo = armadillo = "little armored one"
  • avocado = alteration of Spanish aguacate, from Nahuatl ahuacatl.
  • banana = from Spanish or Portuguese banana, probably from a Wolof word, or from Arabic بأننا “ba’ nana” fingers
  • barbecue =  barbacoa
  • barracuda =  from barracuda May have come from barraco, meaning overlapping tooth
  • bolero =  from Spanish bolero
  • bonanza = bonanza =  “prosperity”
  • bonito =  from Spanish bonito, meaning "beautiful"
  • breeze = from brisa "cold northeast wind" or from Frisian briesen - to blow (wind)
  • burrito = from burrito, a dish originally from Northern Mexico, literally "little donkey"
  • cafeteria = cafetería  = “coffee store”
  • canoe = = from Spanish canoa, from Haitian canaoua
  • canyon = from cañón meaning "a pipe, tube, gorge" from cano, "tube;" ultimately from Latin canna meaning "reed."
  • caramba = from Spanish, meaning "heck"; expression of dread, displeasure, or disapproval, euphemism for carajo
  • cargo = cargar = “to load”
  • Caribbean = from Spanish Caribe, from name of Carib Indians of the region.
  • chocolate = chocolate = “hot water”
  • chorizo = from chorizo, "sausage"
  • cigar = from Spanish cigarro meaning "fag (UK), stogie, stogy", from Mayan sicar or sic, "tobacco"
  • cigarette = from French cigarette "little weed", diminutive of French cigare "stogie", from Spanish cigarro meaning "fag (UK), stogie, stogy."
  • cockroach = from Spanish cucaracha
  • cocoa or cacao = from Spanish cacao, from Nahuatl cacáhuatl
  • cojones = from Spanish cojones meaning "balls, testicles", to denote courage
  • cowboy = from Spanish vaquero, an individual who managed cattle while mounted on horseback, from vaca, "cow", from Latin vacca
  • coyote = coyote
  • desperado = from Spanish desesperado, desperate
  • El Dorado = from El Dorado, literally, "the golden one"
  • El Niño = from El Niño de la Navidad, literally, "the Christmas child" due to the warming of Pacific waters seemed to warm around Christmas
  • embargo = from Spanish embargar, to "seize" or "impound"
  • fiesta = fiesta = “party"
  • Flamenco = Spanish genre of music and dance.
  • hacienda = from Old Spanish facienda, "estate"
  • hombre = from Spanish "hombre", man
  • hurricane = huracán
  • jalapeño = from Spanish, a type of spicy chilli named after Jalapa de Enríquez, a town in Mexico, and the capital of the state of Veracruz
  • jerky = charqui = “dried flesh”
  • junta = from Spanish junta literally "joint"; a board of joint administration; sometimes used to refer to military officers command in a coup d'état. As an adjective, it means "together".
  • key = from Spanish cayo, from Taino cayo (this is English 'key'/'cay'/'quay' as in an island, reef or a linked series of them, not the 'key' with which one locks/unlocks doors)
  • Latino = from Spanish latin
  • loco = loco = “crazy, mad”
  • Lolita = from the diminutive for Lola, short for Dolores
  • macho = from macho, male, brave, the property of being overtly masculine.
  • Marijuana =  from Mexican Spanish - ultimate derivation unknown
  • matador =  from matador meaning "killer"
  • mojito = dim. formed from "mojado" (wet or dripping) probably referring to the mint leaves in the well known Cuban drink
  • mosquito = from mosquito, literally "little fly"
  • nacho = from Nacho, a nickname for the given name Ignacio, inventor of the snack
  • negro = from Spanish, Portuguese, or Italian negro, "black", from Latin Nigrum (nom. Niger) and Greek Νέγρος Negros, both meaning "black.". In Spanish it is not derogatory. In plural, is Negroes.
  • oregano = from orégano, "marjoram"
  • paella = from Spanish paella, from Valencian paella "pan" and originated in Latin patella, also meaning "pan."
  • papaya = from japaya, akin to Arawak papáia
  • patio = from patio, inner courtyard, "an open paved area adjacent to a home"
  • piña colada = from Spanish piña (pineapple), and colada, which means strained, from the Spanish verb colar ("to strain")
  • piñata = from piñata ("jug, pot") from Latin pinea, "pine cone."
  • plaza = plaza = “public square”
  • poncho = poncho = “woolen fabric”
  • potato = from Peninsular Spanish patata, itself from batata, "sweet potato", from Taino and papa, "potato" from Quechua
  • puma = from Spanish "cougar, panther", from Quechua
  • ranch = rancho = “very small rural community”
  • renegade = from renegado, "turncoat, heretic, disowned"
  • rodeo = from rodeo and verb rodear (to go around)
  • salsa = from salsa, "sauce"
  • siesta = from siesta, "nap", from Latin Sexta [hora] "sixth hour"
  • sombrero = from sombrero (literally, shade maker), "hat"
  • taco = from taco, "plug"
  • tango = from Spanish tango.
  • telenovela, or telenovella = from telenovela, "soap oper;tilde: from tilde
  • tequila = from tequila, from the town Tequila, where the beverage originated
  • tobacco = from Spanish (Nahuatl influenced) tabaco, "snuff"
  • tomato = from Spanish tomate, from Nahuatl xitomatl
  • tornado = from Spanish tronada, "thunderstorm", influenced by tornar, "to turn"
  • tortilla = tortilla - “little cake”
  • tuna = from Spanish atún, from Arabic تون tun, from Latin thunnus, from Greek θύννος, thynnos (=tuna fish)
  • vanilla = from Spanish vainilla, diminutive of Latin vaina, from vagina meaning "pod"
  • vertigo = from the Spanish word vértigo
  • Zorro = from Spanish zorro, a fox, originally "smart" (of Basque origin)